Iván de la Nuez



24 October to 5 November 2016

Biography —

Born in Havana (1964). Essayist and curator.He was responsible for shaping La Virreina-Image Center of Barcelona, ​​which was its first director. He was also director of Cultural Activities at the Centre for Contemporary Culture in Barcelona (CCCB). In 1995, he won the Rockefeller Fellowship for the Humanities. It has been awarded (Honor Mention) the Ciutat de Barcelona Awards for his book Red fantasy, and Espais d’Art Award for best criticism published in Spain in 2006.Among his books are The Perpetual Raft (1998); Landscapes after The Wall (1999), The map of salt (2001); Red Fantasy (2006); Postcapital. Review of the Future (2006); Floods: From Wall to Guantanamo (2010) and The Manifesting Communist (2013). These books have been translated into different languages ​​and published in editorials as Mondadori, Peninsula, Debate, Periférica, Surkhamp, Galaxia Gutenberg, Castelvecci or Angelus Novo.He has been curator and co-curator of exhibitions such as The Possible Island (1995); Flood (1999); Human Park (2002), Banquet (2003); Postcapital (2006), De Facto. Joan Fontcuberta Retrospective (2008); Inside and outside of us. Javier Codesal Retrospective (2009); Crisis is Criticism (2009); Atopy. Art and City in the XXI century (2010); and Iconocracia (2015).

Project —

Since the mid-2000s, we have witnessed a historic break in the trajectory and development of Catalan nationalism as it has shifted from the embrace of autonomy to a commitment to political independence. This represents a historic break for the national movement as support for independence hovered at around 10 per cent until 2005 but by September 2015 it reached a level of 48 per cent of Catalan voters. My study, entitled ‘Catalan Independence and the Future of the Spanish State’, will examine this development, firmly locating Catalonia within the Spanish and European crises of recent years. Furthermore, the book is not a narrow study of Catalonia, as it takes into account not only the body of work on nationalism, secession, crisis and political representation but also places the study within a European comparative framework. ‘Catalan Independence and the Future of the Spanish State’ would provide the first systematic examination of Catalan independence for the educated lay reader. A book appearing in mid-2017 allows for a study which will not be constrained by the uncertainties associated with the immediate future.